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#27: The Second Department, Part 3 of 5

November 27, 2011

21 Post The Second Department.png
The Second Department, together with the First Department, is generally what is referred to when a person says the word "Downstate". Some might further define Downstate as including Ulster and Sullivan counties, from the Third Department, and they would have a very good point.

The best rule of thumb I have ever heard of for defining the boundary between Upstate New York and Downstate New York is this: merely extend the perfectly straight line of the boundary between New York and Pennsylvania, which creates the Southern Tier, eastward through the counties of the lower Hudson Valley - Delaware, Sullivan, Ulster, Dutchess, and Columbia - until you reach the boundary between New York and Connecticut. Those counties which are north of that imaginary line are Upstate New York and those south of it are Downstate New York. And wherever the greater part of those five (5) counties lies determines whether they are Upstate or Downstate. Therefore, Delaware and Columbia counties are Upstate but Sullivan, Ulster, and Dutchess counties are Downstate. Very simple.

21-2 Post 2nd Judicial District.png
Compared to the Third and Fourth Departments, the Second Department is a small department. However, it is the most populous department in the state, with over ten (10) million people, as of the 2010 census. Therefore, from a legal perspective, the Second Department is a HUGE department and is responsible for the issuance of a huge volume of decisions and caselaw.

Again, since visuals so readily hammer the point home, this blog post breaks down the Second Department into its essential units - judicial districts and counties.

The Second Department consists of four (4) judicial districts - the Second, Ninth, Tenth, and Eleventh - which are collectively composed of ten (10) counties.


21-3 Post Kings County.png
The Second Judicial District is comprised of two (2) counties: Kings, otherwise known as Brooklyn, and Richmond, otherwise known as Staten Island. Again, like the counties of Bronx and New York, in the First Department, the counties of Kings and Richmond are also two (2) of the five (5) boroughs of New York City and, therefore, their courts are most commonly referred to as the New York City Family Court.

Due to the size and diversity of the Family Court of the City of New York, it is not feasible to set forth a comprehensive list of the names of those judges, at least on this blog.


21-4 Post Richmond County.png
The Kings County Family Court is located at 330 Jay Street, Brooklyn, New York 11201 with a phone number of (347) 401-9870.

For any and all information concerning the day-to-day functioning of this court, the best advice is to contact this court directly.

The Richmond County Family Court is located at 100 Richmond Terrace, Staten Island, New York 10301 with a phone number of (718) 675-8800.

For any and all information concerning the day-to-day functioning of this court, the best advice is to contact this court directly.


21-5 Post 9th Judicial District.png

The Ninth Judicial District is comprised of five (5) counties: Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, and Westchester. By Downstate standards, these counties are actually considered to be a part of Upstate. One of my Downstate friends always defined Upstate New York as "once you hit mountains". I guess that makes sense, especially considering how many times I've gotten the response "Oh, up in the mountains!" once I informed a Downstater that I was from Upstate. So that would mean once you find yourself in the Hudson Highlands, you are effectively in Upstate. Amazingly, not all of us Upstaters wear flannel, drive pick-ups, and have gun racks.


21-6 Post Dutchess County.png

The Dutchess County Family Court is located at 50 Market Street, Poughkeepsie, New York 12601-3204 with a phone number of (845) 431-1850. The Dutchess County Family Court has three (3) judges, pursuant to FCA §131(l). Those judges are Peter M. Forman, Joan S. Posner, and Valentino T. Sammarco. The support magistrates in this court are Elaine Greenblatt and Steven R. Kaufman.

For any and all information concerning the day-to-day functioning of this court, the best advice is to contact this court directly.


21-7 Post Orange County.png

The Orange County Family Court is located at 285 Main Street, Goshen, New York 10924 with a phone number of (845) 291-3030. The Orange County Family Court has four (4) judges, pursuant to FCA §131(r). Those judges are Andrew P. Bivona, Debra J. Kiedaisch, Carol S. Klein, and Lori Currier Woods. The support magistrates are Gladys Braxton, Christine P. Krahulik, and Jeanne Patsalos.

For any and all information concerning the day-to-day functioning of this court, the best advice is to contact this court directly.


21-8 Post Putnam County.png

The Putnam County Family Court is located at 20 County Center, Carmel, New York 10512 with a phone number of (845) 208-7805. The Orange County Family Court has two (2) judges, pursuant to FCA §131(b). Those judges are James F. Reitz and James T. Rooney. The support magistrate is Rachelle Kaufman.

For any and all information concerning the day-to-day functioning of this court, the best advice is to contact this court directly.

Putnam County itself is one of the smaller counties in the area, with only six (6) towns and three (3) villages. It feels more like an extension of Dutchess County, which in fact was the county it was detached from in 1812.


21-9 Post Rockland County.png

The Rockland County Family Court is located at One South Main Street, Suite 300, New City, New York 10956 with a phone number of (845) 638-5300. The Rockland County Family Court has one (1) judge, pursuant to FCA §131(a). That judge is William P. Warren. The support magistrates are Rachelle Kaufman and Catherine Miklitsch.

For any and all information concerning the day-to-day functioning of this court, the best advice is to contact this court directly.

Rockland County is yet another small county in the area. Like Putnam County, it has only a few towns: five (5). Unlike Putnam County, it has a large assortment of villages, twelve (12) of the nineteen (19) of which can largely be found in the Town of Ramapo, the most populous of the towns.


21-10 Post Westchester County.png

The Westchester County Family Court has three (3) separate locations throughout Westchester County. Those locations are as follows:

420 North Avenue, New Rochelle, New York 10801 with a phone number of (914) 831-6590; and

111 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard, White Plains, New York 10601 with a phone number of (914) 824-5500; and

53 South Broadway, 3rd Floor, Yonkers, New York 10701 with a phone number of (914) 831-6555.

Despite the fact that Westchester County Family Court is only allotted four (4) judges, pursuant to FCA §131(h), the Family Court nonetheless has seven (7) judges. Those judges are Kathie E. Davidson, Hal B. Greenwald, Nilda Morales Horowitz, David Klein, Janet C. Malone, Maryann Scattaretico-Naber, and Michelle I. Schaurer. The support magistrates are Michele Reed Bowman, Esther R. Furman, Allen Hochberg, Carol A. Jordan, Christine P. Krahulik, and Rosa Cabanillas-Thompson.

For any and all information concerning the day-to-day functioning of this court, the best advice is to contact this court directly.


21-11 Post 10th Judicial District.png

The Tenth Judicial District is comprised of two (2) counties: Nassau and Suffolk. This is surprising, in a way, as these two (2) counties are both populous enough to be their own judicial district as well. Apart from two (2) of the five (5) boroughs of New York City (Kings and Queens), the remainder of Long Island is divided between these two counties. In fact, Long Island is so populous that, if it were a state, it would rank thirteenth in population, just behind Virginia. Long Island also wins the prize for the longest and largest island in the contiguous United States. In fact, Long Island is larger than the smallest state - Rhode Island - which abuts it to the northeast.


21-12 Post Nassau County.png

The Nassau County Family Court is located at 1200 Old Country Road, Westbury, New York 11590 with a phone number of (516) 571-9055. The Nassau County Family Court has eight (8) judges, pursuant to FCA §131(d). Those judges are Merik R. Aaron, Stacy D. Bennett, Edmund M. Dane, Frank D. Dikrannis, Julianne S. Eisman, Ellen R. Greenberg, Robin M. Kent, and Conrad D. Singer. The support magistrates are Patricia Bannon, Elizabeth A. Bloom, Penelope B. Cahn, Diane M. Dwyer, Neil T. Miller, and Kathleen Watson.

For any and all information concerning the day-to-day functioning of this court, the best advice is to contact this court directly.


21-13 Post Suffolk County.png

The Suffolk County Family Court has two (2) separate locations throughout Suffolk County. Those locations are as follows:

John P. Cohalan, Jr. Court Complex, 400 Carleton Avenue, Central Islip, New York 11722 with phone numbers (631) 853-4647 and (631) 853-4648; and

Courthouse, Suite 308, 889 East Main Street, Riverhead, New York 11901 with phone numbers (631) 852-3905 and (631) 852-3906.

The Suffolk County Family Court has ten (10) judges, pursuant to FCA §131(p). Those judges are Marlene L. Budd, Bernard C. Cheng, David Freundlich, Joan M. Genchi, Richard Hoffmann, John Kelly, Caren L. Loguercio, Martha L. Luft, Andrew G. Tarantino, Jr., and Theresa B. Whelan. The support magistrates are Isabel E. Buse, Aletha Fields, David Grier, Cheryl Joseph-Cherry, Denise Livrieri, Barbara Lynaugh, Rachel Parisi, John Raimondi, and Melissa Willmott.

For any and all information concerning the day-to-day functioning of this court, the best advice is to contact this court directly.


21-14 Post 11th Judicial District.png

The Eleventh Judicial District, similar to the First and Twelfth Judicial Districts of the First Department, is comprised of one (1) county. In this case, that county is Queens.

Queens is the largest borough of New York City, in area, and is second only to Brooklyn in population. Queens is also home to two (2) of the three (3) major airports of New York City: JFK International and LaGuardia. While the Bronx hosts Yankee Stadium, Queens hosts the Mets at Citi Field, in Flushing.

Another interesting aspect of Queens is its cultural diversity. To pass the time, one of the games I used to play was "Guess the Language" of the various commuters I'd overhear on the subways and the Long Island Railroad in Queens. Rarely did I ever hear fewer than two dozen languages.


21-15 Post Queens County.png

Again, like the counties of Bronx, Kings, New York, and Richmond, the county of Queens is the last of the five (5) boroughs of New York City and, therefore, its courts are most commonly referred to as the New York City Family Court. Due to the size and diversity of the Family Court of the City of New York, it is not feasible to set forth a comprehensive list of the names of those judges, at least on this blog.

The Queens County Family Court is located at 151-20 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, New York 11432 with a phone number of (718) 298-0204.

For any and all information concerning the day-to-day functioning of this court, the best advice is to contact this court directly.

And why yellow for the counties of the Second Department? Well, I wanted blue for the Third Department and red for the Fourth Department. So, by default, the color wheel resulted in yellow for the Second Department.